TITLE

Postnatal Care is Critical

AUTHOR(S)
Campbell, Norma
PUB. DATE
March 2009
SOURCE
Midwifery News;Mar2009, Issue 52, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author focuses on the critical role of midwives for the postnatal care of pregnant women before and after delivery. She explains the responsibilities of midwives in ensuring the well-being of mother and child, and the scope of care of midwives, which is from pregnancy ending six weeks after delivery. The author also conveys her messages to midwives, saying that midwives can see their success when women they attended to successfully become mothers.
ACCESSION #
37218302

 

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