TITLE

New doubts about the diet-and-cancer connection

PUB. DATE
October 2000
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;10/17/2000, Vol. 163 Issue 8, p1043
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a study to determine the impact of a low-fat, high-fiber diet on the risk of colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer. Inconsistency of observational studies of the pathogenic role of diet in cancer; Details of the diet used in the study; Incidence of recurrent adenomas among subjects who attained their dietary goals; Conclusion that such dietary changes do not reduce the risk of adenomas, but may be advisable for other health reasons.
ACCESSION #
3706989

 

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