TITLE

Yahoo Snaps Up Analytics Firm IndexTools

AUTHOR(S)
Schachter, Ken
PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
Red Herring;4/9/2008, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the deal of Yahoo Inc. and Hungarian Web analytics company IndexTools in 2008 that is also known as Tensa Kit. The deal is expected to close in the first half of 2008. This move came since investors' attention remained upset about Microsoft Corp.'s $31 per share takeover offer that Yahoo management has rejected as deficient. In a "Wall Street Journal" report, Bill Miller, a Legg Mason mutual fund manager, said he would support Yahoo's decision to remain independent unless Microsoft backed off its threats to reduce its offer.
ACCESSION #
36834928

 

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