TITLE

Pain Perception to the Cold Pressor Test During the Menstrual Cycle in Relation to Estrogen Levels and Comparison with Men

AUTHOR(S)
Hellstrom, Birgitta; Lundberg, Ulf
PUB. DATE
April 2000
SOURCE
Integrative Physiological & Behavioral Science;Apr-Jun2000, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p132
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abstract--Animal and human research has shown that pain sensitivity changes during the menstrual cycle. This has sometimes been ascribed to hormonal variations. The aim of the present study was to examine how perception of pain, induced by the cold pressor test to the dominant hand, was related to gender and phases of the menstrual cycle. A repeated-measures design was used, where twenty-two female students participated at two different phases of the menstrual cycle (days 2--4 and days 20-24). A control group of nineteen male students participated on two occasions, separated by a three week period. The cycle phase during which each woman began her participation was randomized. Pain was induced using the cold pressor test. Pain threshold was determined as the duration of time between when the subject first reported pain and exposure to the painful stimulus. Pain tolerance was determined as the duration of time until the subject withdraw her/his hand from the test water because the pain was too intensive. The results showed that men tolerated significantly greater pain than women. Women's pain threshold was significantly higher during the second phase of the menstrual cycle. Systolic pressure was higher in men than women, increasing more in men in response to cold pressor testing than women. Further research, including measurements of plasma hormone levels during the menstrual cycle, is needed to clarify the role played by estrogens in pain perception.
ACCESSION #
3666076

 

Related Articles

  • Pain discriminates between the sexes. Cohen, Philip // New Scientist;11/02/96, Vol. 152 Issue 2054, p16 

    Reports on findings by researchers in California on the possible different pain mechanisms in men and women. Differences in the response to kappa-opioids in men and women; Implications for the manufacture of designer drugs.

  • Grin and bear it. Holmes, Bob // New Scientist;10/18/97, Vol. 156 Issue 2104, p19 

    Cites a study on a gene for a female-only system of pain relief. Different treatment of pain for male and female; Possibility of a different nonopioid system in females.

  • Women more sensitive to pain, but handle it better.  // Jet;04/27/98, Vol. 93 Issue 22, p55 

    Focuses on a study which indicated that women are more sensitive to pain, but handle it better than men. How the study was conducted; Information on the participants in the study who all suffered from arthritis; Comments from Francis Keefe, of Ohio University and author of a study on this issue.

  • Gender and pain. Criste, Amy // AANA Journal;Dec2002, Vol. 70 Issue 6, p475 

    Identifies the differences between males and females in their reports of pain. Adverse physical effects of pain; Differences in response to opioids between males and females; Differences in pain perception between males and females; Variables that may interfere with the accurate assessment of pain.

  • Who Hurts More, Men or Women? A. P. // Time;2/6/2012, Vol. 179 Issue 5, p14 

    The article discusses research which found that women reported suffering pain more acutely than men and examines possible cultural and biological reasons for the result.

  • Who Hurts More, Men or Women? A. P. // Time International (South Pacific Edition);2/6/2012, Vol. 179 Issue 5, p8 

    The article discusses research which found that women reported suffering pain more acutely than men and examines possible cultural and biological reasons for the result.

  • Who Hurts More, Men or Women? A. P. // Time International (Atlantic Edition);2/6/2012, Vol. 179 Issue 5, p8 

    The article discusses research which found that women reported suffering pain more acutely than men and examines possible cultural and biological reasons for the result.

  • Sex, Gender, and Pain. Sessle, Barry J. // Journal of Orofacial Pain;Summer2000, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p165 

    The article discusses various published reports within the issue, including one on gender differences in pain by Dao and LeResche, one by Woda and Pionchon on orofacial pain and one by Maixner that searchers for an evolutionary explanation for gender differences in pain.

  • Feeling no pain. Marandino, Cristin // Vegetarian Times;Jul98, Issue 251, p17 

    Notes a study which gauged the effects of pain on the different sexes. Proof that women are not the weaker sex; Women's use of coping mechanisms.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics