TITLE

CLIMATE WARMING 'HIGHLY UNUSUAL' SAYS NEW STUDY

AUTHOR(S)
Boswell, Randy
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Rachel's Democracy & Health News;1/22/2009, Issue 995, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the U.S government report "The First Comprehensive Analysis of the Real Data We Have on Past Climate Conditions in the Arctic," by Geological Survey director Mark Myers. The report warns that temperature change in the Arctic is happening at a greater rate than other places in the Northern Hemisphere, and this is expected to continue in the future. As a result, glacier and ice-sheet melting, sea-ice retreat, coastal erosion and sea-level rise can be expected to continue.
ACCESSION #
36614908

 

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