TITLE

THE NORTHERN ATHABASKAN POTLATCH IN EAST-CENTRAL ALASKA, 1900-1930

AUTHOR(S)
Simeone, William E.
PUB. DATE
September 1998
SOURCE
Arctic Anthropology;1998, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p113
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes and analyzes changes in the Athabaskan potlatch of east-central Alaska between 1900 and 1930. Highlights of the traditional Athabaskan potlatch; Enhancement of the ceremony within the parameters of a coherent traditional system of meaning; Influence of acculturation on the transformation or abandonment of aboriginal religious practices; Integration of trade goods into the potlatch.
ACCESSION #
3656507

 

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