TITLE

Sample them all

AUTHOR(S)
Parker, Shafer
PUB. DATE
October 2000
SOURCE
Report / Newsmagazine (National Edition);10/09/2000, Vol. 27 Issue 11, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the Canadian government's DNA Data Bank. How the DNA Data Bank opened in July, 2000 and included a crime scene index and a convicted offenders index; Opinion of Ontario Solicitor General Dave Tsubouchi that samples should be collected from anyone charged under the Criminal Code; Tsubouchi's rejection of claims that DNA testing could lead to excessive invasions of privacy.
ACCESSION #
3654227

 

Related Articles

  • Sample them all. Parker, Shafer // Report / Newsmagazine (BC Edition);10/09/2000, Vol. 27 Issue 11, p21 

    Focuses on the Canadian government's DNA Data Bank. How the DNA Data Bank opened in July, 2000 and included a crime scene index and a convicted offenders index; Opinion of Ontario Solicitor General Dave Tsubouchi that samples should be collected from anyone charged under the Criminal Code;...

  • Sample them all. Parker, Shafer // Report / Newsmagazine (Alberta Edition);10/09/2000, Vol. 27 Issue 11, p21 

    Focuses on the Canadian government's DNA Data Bank. How the DNA Data Bank opened in July, 2000 and included a crime scene index and a convicted offenders index; Opinion of Ontario Solicitor General Dave Tsubouchi that samples should be collected from anyone charged under the Criminal Code;...

  • Genetic policing. Krueger, Ingrid // Alberta Report / Newsmagazine;10/13/97, Vol. 24 Issue 44, p35 

    Cautions the reader on the proposed national DNA data bank in Canada. Tabling by the federal government of legislation allowing the collection of DNA samples; Efforts by the Reform Party to expand DNA sampling to include all charged with an indictable offense; Forecasts for support in the House...

  • THE XY FILES. Brenchley, Fred // Bulletin with Newsweek;06/20/2000, Vol. 118 Issue 6229, p28 

    Reports on the plans to use a national DNA database for law enforcement purposes in Australia. Barriers to the creation of a national database; Preparations for Crimtrac, a crime investigation system that uses DNA databases; Possible causes of discrepancy in the use of DNA databases; Types of...

  • GUILTY GENES.  // American Conservative;Apr2010, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p5 

    The article discusses the move by the state governments in the U.S. to collect genetic fingerprints or DNA specimen of new born infants that will be used in law enforcement.

  • The Advent of DNA Databanks: Implications for Information Privacy. de Gorgey, Andrea // American Journal of Law & Medicine;1990, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p381 

    Genetic identification tests — better known as DNA profiling — currently allow criminal investigators to connect suspects to physical samples retrieved from a victim or the scene of a crime. A controversial yet acclaimed expansion of DNA analysis is the creation of a massive...

  • Unusual suspects. Motluk, Alison // New Scientist;05/23/98, Vol. 158 Issue 2135, p18 

    Raises the question as to whether police are starting to rely too heavily on DNA evidence. Recommendations made by Peter Gammon, President of Great Britain's Police Superintendent's Association regarding a population wide DNA database; Efforts to determine physical appearance of a person based...

  • Blood Drive. Doherty, Brian // Reason;Nov99, Vol. 31 Issue 6, p14 

    Details the plans of Attorney General Janet Reno to collect DNA samples in the United States. Purpose of the National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence; Professions of the commission's members; Criticisms on the commission's recommendations.

  • Calculating and understanding the value of any type of match evidence when there are potential testing errors. Fenton, Norman; Neil, Martin; Hsu, Anne // Artificial Intelligence & Law;Mar2014, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1 

    It is well known that Bayes' theorem (with likelihood ratios) can be used to calculate the impact of evidence, such as a 'match' of some feature of a person. Typically the feature of interest is the DNA profile, but the method applies in principle to any feature of a person or object, including...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics