TITLE

TOUGH TIMES DAMPEN SALARY EXPECTATIONS

AUTHOR(S)
O'Neill, Michael
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Media: Asia's Media & Marketing Newspaper;1/29/2009, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the impact of tough economic times on the salary of the employees. It is noted that a shortage of skilled professionals in the market means that employers have to pay a premium if they are hoping to attract and retain the best talent. Moreover, it cites that few companies are in a position where they are willing or able to pay the talent it may feel it deserves. The global economic recession is definitely not the perfect time to be asking for a pay rise.
ACCESSION #
36542017

 

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