TITLE

THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF THE HUMAN DENTITION

AUTHOR(S)
GREGORY, WILLIAM K.
PUB. DATE
June 1920
SOURCE
Journal of Dental Research;Jun1920, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p215
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article provides a history of the origin and evolution of the human dentition, beginning with the Paleocene placental mammals and moving through the lower primates. It is noted that this is the second article published in the journal as part of a broader research study on human dentition, with the first published in the March, 1920 issue and the third to be published in the September, 1920 issue.
ACCESSION #
36519152

 

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