TITLE

Clinical trials: chasing recruits

PUB. DATE
February 2009
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;2/17/2009, Vol. 180 Issue 4, p375
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the recruitment of research participants for the clinical studies in Canada. The U.S. Officer of the Inspector General states that the disturbing recruitment practices for clinical participants have been developed because of the increasingly commercial clinical trial business. Regulatory reporting obligations concerning the adverse events related to clinical trials are also noted. With the problems involved to people's participation in clinical trials, it notes the policies on safety and protection of research participants are the prior concerns of ethicists, policymakers, and legislators.
ACCESSION #
36422174

 

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