TITLE

STANDLEYI UNA NUEVA SECCIÓN DEL GÉNERO LONCJOCARPUS (LEGUMINOSAE), NUEVAS ESPECIES Y SUBESPECIE PARA MESOAMÉRICA Y SUDAMÉRICA

AUTHOR(S)
S., MARIO SOUSA
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Acta Botanica Mexicana;ene2009, Issue 86, p39
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A new section, sect. Standleyi, is described for the genus Lonchocarpus (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae, Millettieae), based mainly on previously proposed concepts, but not validly published. Also six new taxa for science: five species, lonchocarpus martinezii, L. savannicola, L. semideserti, L. stenophyllus, L. tuxtepecensis and a new subspecies L. lanceolatus subsp. calciphilus are described and illustrated. lonchocarpus pubescens is proposed as an older binomial than L. dipteroneurus and four other names associated previously. To contrast the differences, two keys for the taxa are given, one for the species in Mesoamerica and South America and another for the new section and the sect. Lonchocarpus.
ACCESSION #
36235034

 

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