TITLE

NEVER LET YOUR SENSE OF MORALS KEEP YOU FROM DOING WHAT'S RIGHT: USING NEWLY DEAD BODIES AS EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

AUTHOR(S)
Moore, Dale L.
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Health Matrix: Journal of Law-Medicine;Winter2008, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p105
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the problems regarding the use of newly dead bodies as educational resources for the medical students in the U.S. Relevant to this, arguments on the legal issues of the subjects are explored as well as the explanations on why such educational activities are considered illegal. A highlight on a certain case scenario of a sixty-year-old man who was rushed to the emergency room for his extreme chest pain is likewise provided.
ACCESSION #
36130970

 

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