TITLE

Medical errors, apologies and apology laws

AUTHOR(S)
MacDonald, Noni; Attaran, Amir
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;1/6/2009, Vol. 180 Issue 1, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the disclosure of medical errors as part of the ethical and professional responsibility of medical personnel. It argues that disclosure of medical errors can improve the patient's health, while nondisclosure can put the patient with future medical risks. To address the situation, medical error apology laws have been implemented in the U.S. and Canada.
ACCESSION #
35825978

 

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