TITLE

Reid challenges Gibbons to drop support for coal-fired power plants

AUTHOR(S)
Edwards, John G.
PUB. DATE
December 2008
SOURCE
Las Vegas Business Press (10712186);12/8/2008, Vol. 25 Issue 49, pP15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada has challenged Governor Jim Gibbons on November 27, 2008 to drop his support for coal-fired power plants. The challenge was made following a decision requiring the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to either regulate carbon dioxide emissions from a coal plant in Utah or explain the reason the EPA chose not to do so. The dispute between advocates for coal-fired projects and the Sierra Club over air quality permits is discussed.
ACCESSION #
35752630

 

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