TITLE

Determinants of perceived coercion and outcome in involuntarily committed patients

AUTHOR(S)
van Baars, Antonius W. B.; Mulder, Cornelis L.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background Most involuntarily admitted patients show substantial clinical improvement over time. However, a substantial number of patients (between 19% and 67%) retrospecively do not feel that their admission was justified or beneficial. Objectives To identify clinical factors associated with perceived coercion and outcome of involuntarily admitted patients who are considered to be dangerous to themselves or others. Method We conducted a one-year prospective cohort study in 207 patients committed by court order and assessed demographic characteristics, perceived coercion, insight, symptoms, and levels of dangerousness at 6-month intervals. Results and conclusion We will present the outline of the study and results using primarily baseline assessments. Specifically, we will test the hypothesis that higher levels of perceived coercion will be associated with less insight, higher levels of paranoid symptoms, and higher levels of danger to others as compared to danger to self.
ACCESSION #
35704277

 

Related Articles

  • Perceived coercion and its determinants at psychiatric admission -- are there sex specific patterns? Renberg, Ellinor Salander; Johansson, Britt-Marie; Kjellin, Lars // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background To investigate determinants for perceived coercion during the admission process among voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric patients, with special focus on sex-specific patterns. Methods Patients (n = 282) were interviewed using the Nordic Admission Interview (NorAI),...

  • Symptoms, dangerousness and involuntary admission. Mulder, Cornelis L. // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background The number of involuntary admissions in the Netherlands increased from 40 per 100,000 citizens in 1997 to 48 in 2005. During this period the mental health law did not change. In the Netherlands patients can be involuntarily admitted if they have a mental disorder causing dangerous...

  • Absconding of patients on acute psychiatric wards. Zenner, Gisa; Munk, Ingrid // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background Absconding of patients from acute psychiatric wards poses a significant problem to professional staff and can involve risks for patients and others. Despite research results in the English speaking countries, there is no research on this topic in Germany. Methods Naturalistic study of...

  • Comparison of involuntary hospitalization rates. Engberg, Marianne; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Høyer, Georg; Kjellin, Lars; Sigurjónsdóttir, Maria // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background Civil commitment rates show substantial variation between different countries and over time. Legislation, professionals' ethics and attitudes, socio-demographic variation, and psychiatric services have been suggested as reasons for this. International variations in procedures and...

  • Patients' experiences of coercive treatment and coercive measures in psychiatric care. Wallsten, Tuula; Kjellin, Lars // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background To study coercive treatment like forced medication and coercive measures like seclusion and mechanical restraint during inpatient psychiatric care among committed and voluntarily admitted patients and also to study patients attitudes to coercive treatment and measures. Methods A...

  • Report refutes claims that Scotland's detention rates outstrip rest of UK. McMillan, Ian // Mental Health Practice;Dec2004, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p4 

    Reports that the study conducted by the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland have refuted the claims that people in Scotland are more likely to be detained under mental health legislation than people in England and Wales. Difference in the detention rate among Scotland, England and Wales;...

  • The system of coercive (court mandated) medical measures in the Russian Federation. Dianov, Dmitry; Maltseva, Maya; Kotov, Vyacheslav // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Coercive treatment (CT) in Russia is a court mandated medical measure applied to persons who committed a punishable "socially dangerous act" (SDA) and who are suffering from a mental disorder if it is proved that their dangerousness is due to such disorder. The CT is applied to the...

  • A survey of the criminal careers of hospital order patients. Gibbens, T. C. N.; Robertson, G.; Gibbens, T C // British Journal of Psychiatry;Oct83, Vol. 143, p362 

    All men receiving hospital orders (Section 60) in the UK in the year 1963-64 (excluding those receiving restriction orders (Section 60/65)) were followed up over 15 years with regard to (1) subsequent offences and convictions, (2) hospital admissions, and (3) death. Nine per cent of the patients...

  • A systematic literature review on application and effects of forced admissions. van de Ven-Dijkman, Marieke V.; Schoevers, Robert; Sikkens, Erik // BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1 

    Background The Dutch Association for Psychiatrists is working on a guideline when to decide to use involuntary measures. Therefore, it's necessary to research the (side) effects of forced admission. The main question in a literature research is: What's the effect of forced admission on the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics