TITLE

Determinants of perceived coercion and outcome in involuntarily committed patients

AUTHOR(S)
van Baars, Antonius W. B.; Mulder, Cornelis L.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
BMC Psychiatry;2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 7, Special section p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background Most involuntarily admitted patients show substantial clinical improvement over time. However, a substantial number of patients (between 19% and 67%) retrospecively do not feel that their admission was justified or beneficial. Objectives To identify clinical factors associated with perceived coercion and outcome of involuntarily admitted patients who are considered to be dangerous to themselves or others. Method We conducted a one-year prospective cohort study in 207 patients committed by court order and assessed demographic characteristics, perceived coercion, insight, symptoms, and levels of dangerousness at 6-month intervals. Results and conclusion We will present the outline of the study and results using primarily baseline assessments. Specifically, we will test the hypothesis that higher levels of perceived coercion will be associated with less insight, higher levels of paranoid symptoms, and higher levels of danger to others as compared to danger to self.
ACCESSION #
35704277

 

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