TITLE

Intensive Care Unit Outcomes of Surgical Centenarians: The 'Oldest Old' of the New Millennium

AUTHOR(S)
Wilson, Matthew T.; Crawford, Kenneth L.; Shabot, M. Michael
PUB. DATE
September 2000
SOURCE
American Surgeon;Sep2000, Vol. 66 Issue 9, p870
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study compared the severity of illness and outcomes of surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients age 100 years or older with those of younger SICU patients. Severity of illness was measured with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) and the Quantified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (QTISS). Outcomes were evaluated with SICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, SICU mortality, and hospital mortality. All patients admitted to an urban, tertiary-care SICU from August 1, 1986 to July 31, 1998 (12 years) were included. A total of 24,395 consecutive patients were evaluated of whom nine (0.037%) were age 100 or more. Complete outcome data were available for 13,773 patients who were divided into five groups on the basis of age: <70, 70 to 79, 80 to 89, 90 to 99, and 100 years and above. Nine centenarians were admitted to the SICU of whom one died in the SICU and another died in the hospital after SICU discharge (22.2% overall mortality). Centenarian patients had higher SAPS and QTISS on admission than patients in all other groups, although this difference was not significant because of the small number of centenarians. SICU and hospital LOS were not significantly longer for centenarians. Mortality in the SICU and hospital was significantly different across the age groups and rose with age. However, the modest 11.1 per cent SICU mortality rate in centenarians along with their LOS statistics indicate that these patients fare relatively well in surgical intensive care.
ACCESSION #
3554445

 

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