TITLE

RISK OF LUNG CANCER FROM SILICA DUST

AUTHOR(S)
Cheng, Jim Ichi
PUB. DATE
May 1995
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;5/15/1995, Vol. 152 Issue 10, p1583
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
35492363

 

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