TITLE

Retrieval of Vascular Foreign Bodies Using a Self-Made Wire Snare

AUTHOR(S)
Mallmann, C. V.; Wolf, K. -J.; Wacker, F. K.
PUB. DATE
December 2008
SOURCE
Acta Radiologica;Dec2008, Vol. 49 Issue 10, p1124
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Foreign bodies in the vascular system have a high potential to cause embolization, perforation, and infection. Therefore, numerous commercially available percutaneous retrieval devices have been developed. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a self-made wire snare for the retrieval of foreign bodies in the vascular system. Material and Methods: 16 consecutive patients, who underwent percutaneous foreign-body retrieval between 1997 and 2007, were included in this retrospective analysis. Percutaneous extraction was performed using an adjustable wire snare that was fabricated using a 5F diagnostic Headhunter or Multipurpose catheter and a 4-m-long 0.018-g/inch standard heavy-duty wire that was bent in the middle to create an eccentric loop. Results: Percutaneous foreign-body retrieval was successful in all 16 cases. Intraluminal materials including partially fractured venous catheters, guidewires, a stent, and a vena cava filter were removed from various locations. In six cases, mobilization of the intraluminal material via a pigtail catheter was necessary before using the wire snare for removal. Successful retrieval was investigator independent. In no cases were surgical procedures required, and no relevant complications were encountered. Conclusion: This snare technique is an effective, feasible, and cost-effective method to retrieve intraluminal material. It is an alternative to commercially available retrieval devices.
ACCESSION #
35383907

 

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