TITLE

Fibrous Root System Development

AUTHOR(S)
Phillips, Leonard
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
Arbor Age;Mar2008, Vol. 28 Issue 3/4, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a discussion on developing tree root systems in order to improve tree health in city planning spaces. There are various reasons why trees do poorly in urban plantings, two of which are poor maintenance and the inability of nurseries to develop tree root systems ideal for urban conditions. There are eight options to develop ideal tree root systems, they include using herbicide pellets, mechanical root pruning, root suffocation and root-tip-trapping. Also discusses is containers for these trees.
ACCESSION #
35344691

 

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