TITLE

BIGMOUTH BATS

AUTHOR(S)
Adams, Jacqueline
PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Science World;9/1/2008, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that researchers from the University of Southern Denmark found that the greater bulldog bat is the loudest known flying animal.
ACCESSION #
35236888

 

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