TITLE

The Return of the Strike

PUB. DATE
November 1934
SOURCE
America;11/17/1934, Vol. 52 Issue 6, p123
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that mill owners are reneging on their agreement with U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding the textile strikers. It states that the new National Textile Labor Relations Board collaborates the contention of the leader of the textile strikers Francis J. Gorman. The board confirms that they are still receiving numerous complaints that the strikers are not being re-hired by the mill owners.
ACCESSION #
35030413

 

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