TITLE

ALL IN THE FAMILY

AUTHOR(S)
O'REILLEY, TIM
PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Las Vegas Business Press (10712186);9/29/2008, Vol. 25 Issue 39, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the challenges of maintaining a family-owned business across generations. It cites various factors which drive home the fragility of family ownership, including families who did a poor job in dealing with transition issues and general lack of planning. It highlights several companies who have had success with transitions, including USA Real Estate and Property Management and John Fish Jewelers.
ACCESSION #
35015660

 

Related Articles

  • Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Succession Planning. Faulkner, Jeff // Independent Provisioner;2008, Vol. 1 Issue 6, p16 

    The article focuses on the difficulty in planning for the succession of a family business in the U.S. It is stated that the most common pitfall in succession planning is mistakenly believing that estate planning is the same as succession planning. Estate planning refers to one component of about...

  • THE 2011 SUCCESSION PLANNING DILEMMA. Glynn, Nioll // Accountancy Ireland;Oct2011, Vol. 43 Issue 5, p42 

    The article offers the author's insights regarding the succession planning dilemma of business owners in 2011. The author says that having a clear plan to lead their business and their family through its process is the best way to attain a smooth transition. He also mentions several key factors...

  • Passing the torch. SCHUMACHER, STEVE // Rock Products;Oct2008, Vol. 111 Issue 10, p32 

    The article delineates steps for succession planning for family-owned businesses and corporations. The first step suggested is to set a specific goal and then obtain a business valuation. These steps are followed by developing an estate plan, selecting a successor and reviewing the plan...

  • Panelists: Communication important for family biz. Fluker, Anjali // Crain's Detroit Business;9/11/2006, Vol. 22 Issue 37, p26 

    The article presents information on the advice offered by the panel members of the annual family-owned business forum of the journal "Crain's Detroit Business" regarding succession of family-owned companies. The panel members suggested that businessmen must provide career paths and executive...

  • The need to plan for succession. Scully, Carla Zanetos // Candy Industry;Sep2000, Vol. 165 Issue 9, p20 

    Discusses the need to plan for succession in family businesses. Information on the planning scheme of Anthony-Thomas Candy Co.; Benefit of a buy-sell agreement for family-owned companies; Disadvantages of the lack of planning.

  • A Food Processor's Biggest Deal. Deans, Tom // Food Processing (00156523);Feb2012, Vol. 73 Issue 2, p9 

    The article offers the author's insights on how family business owners prepare for the next generation business take over. The author mentions that business owners should define the person who will lead the business when they are gone. He states that only 10 percent of family businesses have...

  • Keep it in the family. Lucy, Jim // Electrical Wholesaling;Mar1997, Vol. 78 Issue 3, p22 

    Reports on the practice of business owners of passing on the company to their children. Suggestions to avoid mistakes; Early retirement; Information concerning business planning; Family councils; Trust and exposure for successor; Investment in management training; Management skills of...

  • Matters get stickier with the next generation. Porter, Monroe // Contractor Magazine;Aug95, Vol. 42 Issue 8, p40 

    Presents an advisory on how to ensure the smooth succession of a family-owned business. Importance of an outside adviser; Necessity of planning in the succession process.

  • Passing on family businesses can involve options beyond ins. Connolly, Jim // National Underwriter / Life & Health Financial Services;6/23/97, Vol. 101 Issue 25, p7 

    Addresses the need for insurance in the case of passing on of family businesses in the United States. Context in which insurance is important; Instances in which insurance is not the most important factor; Way in which succession planning is generally done, if at all.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics