TITLE

Modifiable risk factors remain significant causes of medium term mortality after first time Coronary artery bypass grafting

AUTHOR(S)
Kunadian, Babu; Dunning, Joel; Millner, Russell W. J.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery;2007, Vol. 2, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Whilst there is much current data on early outcomes after Coronary artery bypass grafting(CABG), there is relatively little data on medium term outcomes in the current era. The purpose of this study is to present a single surgeon series comprising of all first time CABG patients operated on with the technique of cross clamp fibrillation from Feb-1996 to through to Jan-2003, and to seek risk factors for medium term mortality in these patients. Methods: Data was collected from Hospital Episode Statistics and departmental patient administration and tracking systems and cross checked using database techniques. Patient outcomes were searched using the National Health Service strategic tracing service. Results: Mean follow up was 5.3 years(0-9.4 years) and was complete for all patients. 30-day survival was 98.4%, 1-year survival 95% and 8-year survival 79%. Cox-regression analysis revealed that several modifiable pre-operative risk factors remain significant predictors of medium term mortality, including Diabetes(Hazard Ratio(HR) 1.73, 95%CI 1.21-2.45), Chromic obstructive pulmonary disease(HR 2.02, 95%CI 1.09-3.72), Peripheral vascular disease(HR 1.68, 95%CI 1.13-2.5), Body mass index>30(HR 1.54, 95%CI 1.08-2.20) and current smoker at operation(HR 1.67, 95%CI 1.03-2.72). However hypertension(HR 1.31, 95%CI 0.95-1.82) and Hypercholestrolaemia(HR 0.81, 95%CI 0.58-1.13) were not predictive which may reflect adequate post-operative control. Conclusion: Coronary artery bypass surgery using cross clamp fibrillation is associated with a very low operative mortality. Medium term survival is also good but risk factors such as smoking at operation, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity and diabetes negatively impact this survival and should be aggressively treated in the years post-surgery.
ACCESSION #
34950195

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics