TITLE

Appropriate Prescribing of Oral Beta-Lactam Antibiotics

AUTHOR(S)
Holten, Keith B.
PUB. DATE
August 2000
SOURCE
American Family Physician;8/1/2000, Vol. 62 Issue 3, p611
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Beta-lactam antibiotics include penicillins, cephalosporins and related compounds. As a group, these drugs are active against many gram-positive, gram-negative and anaerobic organisms. Information based on "expert opinion" and antimicrobial susceptibility testing supports certain antibiotic choices for the treatment of common infections, but less evidence-based literature is available to guide treatment decisions. Evidence in the literature supports the selection of amoxicillin as first-line antibiotic therapy for acute otitis media. Alternative drugs, such as amoxicillin-clavulanate,trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefuroxime axetil, can be used to treat resistant infections. Penicillin V remains the drug of choice for the treatment of pharyngitis caused by group A streptococci. Inexpensive narrow-spectrum drugs such as amoxicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are first-line therapy for sinusitis. Animal and human bites can be treated most effectively with amoxicillin-clavulanate. For most outpatient procedures, amoxicillin is the preferred agent for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis. Beta-lactam antibiotics are usually not the first choice for empiric outpatient treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Based on the literature, the role of beta-lactam antibiotics in the treatment of bronchitis, skin infections and urinary tract infections remains unclear.
ACCESSION #
3494542

 

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