TITLE

152: Accuracy and Precision of Handheld BladderScan BVI 6100 in residual urine volume measurement: A comparison with Transabdominal Ultrasound scanner and Urethral Catheterization

AUTHOR(S)
Ng, Elaine; Tay, L. H.; Toh, H. P.; Song, K.; Tan-Ho, Y. J.
PUB. DATE
November 2008
SOURCE
Indian Journal of Urology;Supplement2, Vol. 24, pS104
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduction: Assessment of bladder function is an important assessment in the Urology/Continence Clinic. The handheld bladder scanner is a non-invasive tool that can be used to assess the bladder volume. Evaluating the accuracy is an important key to high quality patient care. The aim of the study was to determine the relative accuracy of the handheld bladderscan BVI 6100, for determing bladder urine volume: a comparison with the Hitachi Ultrasound Scanner EUB 6500 (transabdominal ultrasound scanner) and urethral catheterization. Methods: This is a prospective study. 100 patients that are schedule for procedures requiring catheterisation will be study. The ultrasound measurements of both BVI 6100 and Hitachi Ultrasound Scanner EUB 6500 were compared with the post-scan bladder volumes obtained by catheterization in the same patients. The ultrasounds of BVI 6100 and Hitachi Ultrasound Scanner EUB 6500 and were followed immediately (within 5 min) by in-and-out catheterizations while the patients were in a supine position. Results: There were 100 subjects recruited. Male: Female = 85: 15 (mean age 71 years ranging from 33 years to 91 years). The BVI 6100 and Hitachi Ultrasound demonstrated a correlation of bladder scan volume vs. catheterization volume of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively. The mean difference between both the BVI 6100 and Hitachi Ultrasound is 4.5 and 6.0 ml, respectively from catheterization. The difference of accuracy between the two models (BVI 6100 and Hitachi Ultrasound EUB 6500) vs. catheterization were not significant. Conclusions: The accuracy of BVI 6100 is comparable to that of the Hitachi Ultrasound Scanner EUB 6500 in estimating in the true residual urine volumes with catheterization. It is sufficient enough for us to recommend its use as an alternative to catheterization.
ACCESSION #
34880958

 

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