TITLE

Does the additional application of a polylactide film (SurgiWrap) to a lightweight mesh (TiMesh) reduce adhesions after laparoscopic intraperitoneal implantation procedures? Experimental results obtained with the laparoscopic porcine model

AUTHOR(S)
Schug-Paß, Christine; Sommerer, Florian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Lippert, Hans; Köckerling, Ferdinand
PUB. DATE
November 2008
SOURCE
Surgical Endoscopy;Nov2008, Vol. 22 Issue 11, p2433
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Intraperitoneal repair of incisional hernias using a mesh makes particular demands on the material used. In addition to good integration of the mesh on the parietal side, adhesions to the visceral peritoneum must be avoided. Large-pore, light-weight meshes induce fewer adhesions than heavy-weight polypropylene meshes. Although numerous adhesion-barrier substances for use in combination with a polypropylene mesh have been tested already, mostly in open small animal models, unequivocal benefits have been identified to date in only a few of the experiments. Using the laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique, six pigs were implanted with either a lightweight polypropylene mesh (TiMesh light) or TiMesh plus an adhesion-barrier film made of polylactide (SurgiWrap). After 3 months, the animals underwent a postmortem laparoscopy, and specimens were obtained for planimetric and histologic investigations. No adhesions to intestinal structures were found in any of the animals. Adhesions between the greater omentum and the mesh did not differ significantly between the TiMesh (32%) and SurgiWrap (33.5%) groups. The shrinkage of the mesh’s surface area was comparable between the two groups (18% vs. 21%). Histology showed pronounced inflammatory reaction and bridging of scar tissue between the filaments with the use of SurgiWrap versus TiMesh light without film. However, immunohistochemical investigations examining the partial volume of the inflammatory cells, the proliferation marker Ki67, and the apoptotic index at the interface of the filaments all failed to show any significant differences. To avoid adhesions, it is essential that the acute and chronic inflammatory reaction to the implanted material be as small as possible. This requirement is met specifically by the lightweight polypropylene mesh TiMesh light. The additional application of a slowly absorbable adhesion-barrier film made of polylactide (SurgiWrap) does not appear to confer any further benefit.
ACCESSION #
34748828

 

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