TITLE

Unlocking the Emotional Brain

AUTHOR(S)
Ecker, Bruce
PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Psychotherapy Networker Magazine;Sep/Oct2008, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information regarding the effective remedy for unwanted automatic emotional responses. It seemed well established that when some new emotional learning first becomes installed in stable, and long-term memory. Moreover, transformational shifts can become a regular occurrence in every therapist's day-to-day practice through cooperating closely with the built-in juxtaposition process of deep change that's part of the brain's standard operating procedures.
ACCESSION #
34692355

 

Related Articles

  • Threat and promise - a balancing act. Rose, Chris // CPJ: Counselling & Psychotherapy Journal;Mar2005, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p38 

    This article discusses the issue related to psychotherapy. In a therapy group, one of the initial tasks is the balancing of threat and promise. In the first meeting, the priority is that the members survive and come back for the second. The promise needs to outweigh the threat if the group is to...

  • News: in brief.  // CPJ: Counselling & Psychotherapy Journal;Mar2005, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p48 

    This article presents news briefs related to psychotherapy. The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has announced £300,000 for a Rural Stress Action Plan that will help charity and voluntary organizations to set up projects to deal with stress in rural areas. A project due...

  • In search of happiness. Faugier, Jean // Nursing Standard;5/2/2007, Vol. 21 Issue 34, p22 

    Unlike other ‘talking’ therapies, psychotherapy centres on transferance. While it can be a painful experience, people feel and function better for it.

  • RECOGNIZING AND UTILIZING PROJECTIVE IDENTIFICATION IN BRIEF PSYCHODYNAMIC THERAPY: A CASE EXAMPLE. Mancillas, Adriean // Clinical Social Work Journal;Fall2006, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p267 

    Projective identification is a means by which clients unconsciously communicate their affective, and often intolerable, experiences. Being on the receiving end of a client's projective identifications can be elusive, confusing, and intense; consequently, the information afforded by projective...

  • THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF AFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS: A CROSS-THEORETICAL MODEL. Baylis, Peter J. // Clinical Social Work Journal;Mar2006, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p61 

    The integration of information from neuroscience with the practice of psychotherapy presents with numerous challenges. However, neuroscience research can guide practitioners in the purposeful use of the therapeutic relationship to enhance clinical outcomes. This article reviews such research...

  • PSYCHOTHERAPY IN PRISON: THE FRAME IMPRISONED. Huffman, Eric G. // Clinical Social Work Journal;Fall2006, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p319 

    Very little is written in the literature by or about clinicians providing psychotherapy in prison. This article will examine psychotherapy in prison through the criteria of Langs' (Psychotherapy: A basic text. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson) therapeutic frame. These criteria include: stability and...

  • Marvin Goldfried - integrationist with attitude. Pointon, Clare // CPJ: Counselling & Psychotherapy Journal;Mar2005, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p9 

    This article presents an interview with Marvin Goldfried, Professor of Psychology at New York State University. In response to a question about the orientation of his work to a potential client, Goldfried says that he identifies as a cognitive-behaviour therapist who practises integratively. In...

  • Why I like Gestalt therapy, as a hole. Roth, Marvin Carson // Personnel & Guidance Journal;Jan73, Vol. 51 Issue 5, p336 

    In the emotionally in tense setting of a weekend encounter group, dramatic experiences and insights often take place. However, the ultimate benefits or enduring effects of specific episodes are difficult to assess. In the absence of tangible, long-range tokens of positive change, grout...

  • Giving men a little nudge. Scheffler, Mark // Crain's Chicago Business;6/6/2005, Vol. 28 Issue 23, p47 

    The article reports that life coaches usually work on a hourly basis, either in person or on the phone, with fees ranging from $150 to $500 an hour. Most client-coach hookups happen by word of mouth, at networking meetings or through human resources departments. A typical session involves a...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics