TITLE

New regulations tackle nitrates at source

PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Utility Week;9/12/2008, Vol. 29 Issue 17, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that about 70 per cent of England is designated a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone under new regulations on the use of nitrates published by the Great Britain Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Starting January 2008, farmers will have to minimise the amount of nitrates from fertiliser and manures that gets into rivers.
ACCESSION #
34656132

 

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