TITLE

Stress arousal `good for employees and business'

AUTHOR(S)
Overell, Stephen
PUB. DATE
February 1998
SOURCE
People Management;2/19/1998, Vol. 4 Issue 4, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on a study at the University of East Anglia, which concluded that problems are aggravated by the burgeoning stress management industry and that stress arousal is actually beneficial for employees and business. Factors driving the vogue of stress remedies; Criticisms against the stress management industry; Reaction of stress consultants to the study's findings.
ACCESSION #
343086

 

Related Articles

  • Stressing Health. Kerner, Suzanne // Business NH Magazine;Sep2003, Vol. 20 Issue 9, p47 

    Reports on the prevalence of job stress in the U.S. Personal, professional, and environmental stress experienced by employees; Negative impact of job stress on employees' health and the company; Evidence that 40 percent of job turnover is due to stress; Ways on how employers can help employees...

  • Conquering Workplace Stress. Bromme, Trishe // BusinessWest;Jan2003, Vol. 19 Issue 9, p58 

    Focuses on the job stress. Effects of chronic stress on physical and mental health; Sources of stress in the workplace; Symptoms of stress.

  • Is your job making you sick?  // Consumer Reports on Health;Sep2000, Vol. 12 Issue 9, p3 

    Discusses the health impact of job-related stress.

  • Association Between Job Characteristics and Health Behaviors in Japanese Rural Workers. Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Kayaba, Kazunori; Yoshimura, Manabu; Sawada, Machi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Sakai, Kenichiro; Gotoh, Tadao; Nago, Naoki // International Journal of Behavioral Medicine;Jun2003, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p125 

    Associations between job characteristics defined by the Karasek's job demand-control model and health behaviors were investigated in a cross-sectional analysis of 6,759 Japanese rural workers. High psychological demands were associated with heavy smoking, exaggerated prevalence of alcohol...

  • Your boss may be killing you.  // USA Today Magazine;Sep96, Vol. 125 Issue 2616, p13 

    Looks at a European study which found that job stress can bring on a heart attack, bronchitis, or even induce violent behavior. Detrimental effects of higher workloads combined with demanding performance levels.

  • Stress at work is widespread and on the increase. Kinnie, Nick // People Management;8/8/2002, Vol. 8 Issue 16, p45 

    Discusses findings of a study on the high levels of stress at work in Great Britain. Causes of work stress; Health problems linked with high stress levels; Occupations that most likely to suffer from stress.

  • Feedback.  // Personnel Today;2/12/2002, p1 

    Focuses on the different views of employees on stressed jobs in Great Britain. Issue of health problem; Basis of employees stress; Risks of stressful occupation.

  • out box. Doig, Mike // Employee Benefits;Jul2003, p58 

    Provides information about occupational stress. Physical and emotional signs; Effect on an individual's ability to function.

  • Don't put your work into your heart.  // Men's Health;Oct90, Vol. 5 Issue 4, p12 

    Reports that stress on the job may lead to actual physical changes in the heart according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

  • Perceived job stress and mental health in precision machine workers of Japan: a 2 year cohort study. Mino, Y.; Shigemi, J.; Tsuda, T.; Yasuda, N.; Bebbington, P. // Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Jan1999, Vol. 56 Issue 1, p41 

    Cites a study to determine the impact of perceived job stress on the mental health in occupational settings. Methods applied in the study; Analysis of multiple logistic regression; Dependency of type of job stress that predicts mental health on the characteristics of the workplace.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics