TITLE

Microemboli detection on extracorporeal bypass circuits

AUTHOR(S)
Lynch, J. E.; Riley, J. B.
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Perfusion;Jan2008, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Numerous authors have associated gaseous microembolization with adverse cerebral outcomes during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The introduction to this review provides background on the connection between microemboli and adverse cerebral outcomes. This connection is often difficult to quantify, as outcomes depend on a number of factors, including the size of the bubble, where it passes through the patient, patient comorbidities and other factors. Nonetheless, numerous studies have shown statistically significant differences in the mean number of cerebral emboli detected in patients that stroked and those that did not, as well as for patients with major cardiac complications and patients with a longer length of hospital stay. Our introduction is followed by case reports and laboratory studies showing how monitoring for gaseous microemboli (GME) can be used to reduce the embolic load delivered to the patient through the bypass circuit. These methods include improved qualification of bypass circuit design prior to surgery, modification of priming procedures to reduce air in the circuit at the start of surgery, new methods for injecting drugs into the circuit during surgery, and better detection of removal of sources of air during surgery. The review concludes with background on the ultrasonic detection of GME, comparing through-transmission gross air detectors and Doppler ultrasound technology with fixed-beam ultrasonic imaging of emboli, a new ultrasonic technique that images moving emboli in the blood using a single ultrasound transducer element in a fixed position. This overview is meant to shed light on why different ultrasonic detection technologies report widely varying counts and emboli loads, and why fixed-beam ultrasonic imaging represents an improvement in the ability to monitor, measure and quantitate embolic load during CPB.
ACCESSION #
34264824

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics