TITLE

Finding Optimism in Uncertain Times: The Increasingly Critical Role of the Financial Planner

AUTHOR(S)
Holland, Dennis S.
PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Journal of Financial Planning;Sep2008, Vol. 21 Issue 9, Special section p14
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a survey of middle income consumers in the U.S. done by First Command Financial Services, examining attitudes and behaviors exhibited by such people during uncertain economic times. People surveyed were between the ages of 25 and 70, and had median incomes of $50,000 to $200,000, the article states. Topics include the saving habits of Americans on a monthly basis, feelings of financial security, and the effect of debt on the middle-income consumer. Also discussed are families who feel stretched on a monthly basis.
ACCESSION #
34262448

 

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