TITLE

Pediatric enrollment challenges: 92% of parents never asked

PUB. DATE
August 2008
SOURCE
Clinical Trials Administrator;Aug2008, Vol. 6 Issue 8, p89
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses pediatric participation in clinical trials in the U.S. A poll by C.S. Mott Children's Hospital indicates that parents are not the only ones who are reluctant to consider enrolling children. It shows that 92% of parents said they had never been asked about participating in research involving children. The reasons parents might choose to include their children in a study are cited.
ACCESSION #
34031698

 

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