TITLE

2008 - Review: Late percutaneous coronary intervention after AMI improves survival more than optimal medical therapy

AUTHOR(S)
Brott, Brigitta C.; Hillegass, William B.
PUB. DATE
July 2008
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;7/15/2008, Vol. 149 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a study that was conducted by A. Abbate and colleagues on late percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) improves survival more than optimal medical therapy. The study compared late PCI of the infarct-related artery (IRA) plus medical therapy with optimal medical therapy alone in hemodynamically stable patients enrolled more then 12 hours after onset of symptoms of AMI.
ACCESSION #
33742476

 

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