TITLE

Rethinking Protein Intake: More May Be Better as We Age

AUTHOR(S)
Schepers, Anastasia
PUB. DATE
August 2008
SOURCE
Environmental Nutrition;Aug2008, Vol. 31 Issue 8, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the importance of protein in the body. It notes that the Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein is 46 grams a day for women and 56 grams for men. It stresses that high protein intake may lead to the decline of kidney or liver function. Reasons why a person needs more protein are also presented.
ACCESSION #
33212051

 

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