TITLE

Death and tax brackets: link between income inequality and mortality hold true in US, but not in Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Basky, Greg
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;6/27/2000, Vol. 162 Issue 13, p1866
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the results of a study that shows that income inequality and all-cause mortality were not associated in Canada. Relationship between the two in the United States, according to past studies; Possible explanations for the findings, such as more equitable distribution of wealth and greater heterogeneity of communities in Canada.
ACCESSION #
3301762

 

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