TITLE

CANADIAN FOREIGN POUCY: A PROGRESSIVE OR STAGNATING FIELD OF STUDY?

AUTHOR(S)
Gecelovsky, Paul; Kukucha, Christopher J.
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
Canadian Foreign Policy (CFP);2008, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p109
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an assessment of whether the Canadian foreign policy (CFP) is a stagnating or progressive field of study at the present time borrowed from a study by philosopher of mathematics and science Imre Lakatos. It notes that the notion of progress and stagnation are irrelevant because the study outlined by Lakatos is associated more to social than natural sciences. The survey conducted by the authors in early 2007 to assess the current state of the field is also discussed.
ACCESSION #
32895575

 

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