TITLE

Ponseti’s vs. Kite’s method in the treatment of clubfoot-a prospective randomised study

AUTHOR(S)
Alok Sud; Akshay Tiwari; Deep Sharma; Sudhir Kapoor
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
International Orthopaedics;Jun2008, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p409
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abstract  Ponseti’s and Kite’s methods of conservative management in idiopathic congenital clubfoot were compared in a prospective randomised study consisting of 45 infants (67 feet) younger than 3 months, from March 2003 through February 2004. There were 36 and 31 feet that underwent treatment by Ponseti’s and Kite’s methods, respectively. After an average follow-up of 27.24 months in the Ponseti group, correction was achieved in 33 feet (91.7%), with only three patients requiring surgical management. There were seven relapses (21.1%), all of which were corrected conservatively. However, two of these required surgical intervention on showing a relapse again in the second year. In the Kite group, we achieved correction in 21 feet (67.7%) after an average follow-up of 24.8 months, with ten patients requiring surgical intervention. There were eight relapses of which only four could be corrected conservatively. We could also achieve correction in very severe feet (Dimeglio classification) in a significantly higher percentage using Ponseti’s method, in significantly lesser time and with fewer casts. We are of the opinion that Ponseti’s method is superior to Kite’s method in achieving correction in idiopathic clubfeet in a relatively shorter period of time when used to treat young infants.
ACCESSION #
32805648

 

Related Articles

  • Intraoral osteotomies using piezosurgery for distraction in an infant with Pierre–Robin sequence. Heiland, Max; Blessmann, Marco; Pohlenz, Philipp; Lei Li; Schmelzle, Rainer; Blake, Felix // Clinical Oral Investigations;Sep2007, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p303 

    Airway management in infants with Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is often challenging. Advancement of the tongue base using mandibular distraction in neonates can avoid tracheotomy and is increasingly propagated. The osteotomies can be performed via intra- and extraoral approaches. Nowadays, for...

  • Correction of Arthrogrypotic Clubfoot With a Modified Ponseti Technique. Harold van Bosse; Salih Marangoz; Wallace Lehman; Debra Sala // Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research;May2009, Vol. 467 Issue 5, p1283 

    Abstract  Surgical releases for arthrogrypotic clubfeet have high recurrence rates, require further surgery, and result in short, painful feet. We asked whether a modified Ponseti technique could achieve plantigrade, braceable feet. Ten patients (mean age, 16.2 months; range, 3–40...

  • The tiniest patients. Koop, C. Everett // Newsweek;Spring/Summer97, Vol. 129 Issue 9, p51 

    Looks at the history of fetal and pediatric surgery from the 1940s through the 1990s. The once-high mortality rates for patients of such surgery now substantially reduced; Various groundbreaking research work; The promise of future advances in the field.

  • CONTINUOUS PASSIVE MOTION AFTER SURGERY IN INFANTS WITH CLUBFOOT LED TO GREATER SHORT-TERM BUT NOT LONG-TERM IMPROVEMENT RELATIVE TO STANDARD IMMOBILIZATION. Zeifang, F.; Carstens, C.; Schneider, S.; Thomsen, M. // Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;May2006, Vol. 88-A Issue 5, p1167 

    The article discusses the results of a study examining whether continuous passive motion (CPM) is more effective than standard cast immobilization for infants who have had surgical correction of clubfoot. The study found that infants in the CPM group had greater improvement than in the...

  • Commentary. Karol, Lori A. // Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;May2006, Vol. 88-A Issue 5, p1167 

    The article comments on a study by F. Zeifang and colleagues comparing the effectiveness of continuous passive motion (CPM) and cast immobilization in infants who had surgery to release clubfoot. According to Zeifang and colleagues, CPM would lessen postoperative stiffness. However, they failed...

  • Comparison of Ponseti and Kite's method of treatment for idiopathic clubfoot. Shyam, Ashok K.; Rijal, Raju; Shrestha, Bikram Prasad; Singh, Girish Kumar; Singh, Mahipal; Nepal, Pravin; Khanal, Guru Prasad; Rai, P. // Indian Journal of Orthopaedics;Mar/Apr2011, Vol. 45 Issue 2, p188 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Comparison of Ponseti and Kite's method of treatment for idiopathic clubfoot," by Rijat et al.

  • Laparoscopic nephrectomy in children: Initial experience. Shankar, Gowri; Babu, Narendra M.; Ramesh, S.; Srimuthy, K. R. // Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons;Oct-Dec2006, Vol. 11 Issue 4, p223 

    Aims: Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic nephrectomy in infants and children. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2005, 28 children, aged 3 months to 14 years underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy, laparoscopic nephroureterectomy and heminephrectomy. Medical...

  • Demographics of Traumatic Amputations in Children. Loder, Randall T. // Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;May2004, Vol. 86-A Issue 5, p923 

    The demographics of traumatic amputations in children are not well known. The purpose of this review was to identify those demographics for use as a possible guide for prevention strategies. There were 256 amputations in 235 children. The mean age (and standard deviation) at the time of the...

  • Lower surgical rates, fewer revision procedures seen with Ponseti method. Brockenbrough, Gina // Orthopedics Today;Mar2010, Vol. 30 Issue 3, p60 

    The article discusses research on the clinical efficiency of the Ponseti method as a surgical treatment for clubfoot deformities, by A. Matthew and colleagues, published in the 2010 issue of "The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery."

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics