TITLE

CEO Compensation and the Responsibilities of the Business Scholar to Society

AUTHOR(S)
Walsh, James P.
PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
Academy of Management Perspectives;May2008, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author responds to congressional testimony by Chicago University professor Steven N. Kaplan on compensation for chief executive officers (CEOs). He notes that the U.S. House of Representatives approved a resolution that would allow shareholders to approve compensation packages for CEOs. He suggests Kaplan's research on how stock market performance of a company relates to the salaries of that company's executives is inconclusive. He suggests that comparisons of CEO salaries to other salaries have led to complaints. He notes corporate governance studies regarding the termination of CEOs by corporate boards for poor performance and suggests that as a scholar, Kaplan does not represent a good role model.
ACCESSION #
32739757

 

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