TITLE

Tabra Tunoa Making A Difference

AUTHOR(S)
Bullis, Douglas
PUB. DATE
December 1992
SOURCE
Ornament;Winter92, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article profiles jeweler Tabra Tunoa. A native of Oklahoma, Tunoa has lived in the Samoan Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Costa Rica, Mexico and Spain. She collects ideas and treasures each year during three months of travel to South America, Asia and Africa. The article features some of Tunoa's works, including a Mexican cat eye shell earring with Philippine dentallum shell and Kenyan ostrich egg shell.
ACCESSION #
32696196

 

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