TITLE

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
Critical Care Nurse;Jun2008, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p83
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information about ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and its treatment. Some risk factors for VAP are low level of consciousness, supine positioning with head of the bed (HOB) flat and gastric distention. Suggested actions for nursing patients with VAP include keeping HOB of mechanically ventilated patients elevated at 30° or higher.
ACCESSION #
32682753

 

Related Articles

  • Your ventilated patient may be at risk for VAP. Kusterbeck, Stacey // ED Nursing;Nov2011, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p6 

    The article focuses on the risks of a ventilated patient for a ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) if the patient has aspirated before being intubated. It states that pulmonary edema patients are at risk if there is large amount of secretions since the tube does not allow cough reflex that...

  • Patient-Ventilator Interaction During Noninvasive Ventilation. Hess, Dean R. // Respiratory Care;Feb2011, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p153 

    There is arguably more evidence to support the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) than any other practice related to the care of patients with acute respiratory failure. Despite this strong evidence base, NIV seems to be under-utilized and the failure rate (need for intubation) may be as high...

  • A prospective study of antibiotic susceptibility in patients with ventilator associated pneumonia. Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Tabarsi, Payam; Mohammad, Majid Malek; Marjan, Majid; Shamaei, Masoud; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Chitsazan, Mandana; Radmand, Golnar; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Jamaati, Hamid Reza // Anaesthesia, Pain & Intensive Care;Jan-Apr2012, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p31 

    Background: An outbreak of antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria, particularly Acinetobacter, in intensive care unit is of great importance for intensivists due to high mortality and low effective therapy. Objective: We aimed to evaluate antibiotic susceptibility of isolated gram-negatives...

  • Catching Up with the Literature.  // AARC Times;Mar2011, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p24 

    The article offers information on various studies related to mechanical ventilation and respiratory care. A study shows that diaphragm pacing (DP) replacement of mechanical ventilation in ventilator-dependent children provides tidal volumes of thier basal needs. Another study suggests that...

  • BRUSHING PATIENTS' TEETH LOWERS RISK OF PNEUMONIA.  // RN;Mar2009, Vol. 72 Issue 3, p19 

    The article discusses a study on the effect of oral hygiene on the infection rate of mechanical ventilator patients. It revealed that pneumonia rates were significantly decreased when intensive care personnel cleaned patient teeth every 12 hours with sodium monofluorophosphate paste and a...

  • To Brush 'Em or Not: Does Tooth Brushing Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia? Chlan, Linda L. // Critical Care Alert;Sep2011, Vol. 19 Issue 6, p44 

    The author comments on a study by N. J. Ames and colleagues, which examined the effect of tooth brushing in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilator support.

  • Ventilation: What Every Critical Care Nurse Needs to Know. Tanguay, Teddie // Dynamics;Summer2014, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p37 

    No abstract available.

  • Taking your patient off a ventilator. Astle, Sonia M.; Smith, Dwayne // RN;May2007, Vol. 70 Issue 5, p34 

    The article provides tips to nurses on how to determine the patient's readiness for weaning. Prolonged use of mechanical ventilation increases the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia and airway trauma, need for additional sedation and increases the cost of hospitalization. Timing is critical...

  • Caring for the mechanically ventilated patient: part one. Newmarch, Christine // Nursing Standard;1/4/2006, Vol. 20 Issue 17, p55 

    This article examines the nursing care of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. It focuses on the physiological changes and the clinical skills needed to assess and implement care for these patients. Part two, which will be published next week, examines weaning patients...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics