TITLE

Comparative risk

AUTHOR(S)
Rehder, Sharon A.
PUB. DATE
June 1997
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Jun97, Vol. 51 Issue 6, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Features the New York Department of Education Conservation's Comparative Risk Project, an initiative aimed to establish a system for gathering information available about the risk posed by various chemicals. Plans in using data from the system in pollution prevention; Chemical categories developed under the project; Plans of the department to include the public in the project.
ACCESSION #
325362

 

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