TITLE

San Francisco agencies work harder to recruit

AUTHOR(S)
Cuneo, Alice Z.
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
Advertising Age;6/26/2000, Vol. 71 Issue 27, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that advertising agencies in San Francisco, California are redoubling their efforts to recruit entry-level staffers. Incentives for those who bring in new talent; Re-evaluation of training and salary scales for new employees; Warning by advertising organizations that salaries must be raised to prevent talent from going to other industries; How entry-level salaries in advertising compare with ad executives' pay.
ACCESSION #
3249883

 

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