TITLE

AGM 2007: Vancouver: Jane Austen's "passion for taking likenesses": Portraits of the Prince Regent in Emma

AUTHOR(S)
Murray, Douglas
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Persuasions: The Jane Austen Journal;2007, Issue 29, p132
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author discusses whether novelist Jane Austen dedicated her novel "Emma" to "His Royal Highness the Prince of Regent," George Augustus Frederick, the Prince of Wales and the future George IV. She suggests that the connection between Emma and its dedicatee is closer than most readers have ever suspected, for its pages contain a carefully-drawn double portrait of the Prince Regent. She notes that the characters of Emma and Frank Churchill in the novel "Emma" suggest important components of the Prince's history, situation and character.
ACCESSION #
32204005

 

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