TITLE

Soyuz "lifeboat" gets the all-clear from NASA

PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
New Scientist;5/24/2008, Vol. 198 Issue 2657, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the U.S. National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) has given clearance to the Soyuz spacecraft to go ahead for its mission to the International Space Station (ISS) despite the incidents that concern the space craft. According to reports, NASA assesses that the Soyuz capsule is safe and sound, and is not holed so the ship can sail on its rescue mission to the ISS. It notes the spacecraft will sail on May 31, 2008.
ACCESSION #
32198994

 

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