TITLE

Tax warning branded a scare tactic

AUTHOR(S)
Le Gouais, Marcel
PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
Mortgage Strategy;5/19/2008, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the tax warning statement of the DTE Group in response to Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC) campaign against landlords who do not declare their rental income on tax returns in Great Britain. It notes that HMRC have already started sending letters to hundreds of landlords requiring them to declare thier rental incomes. The Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA) who received a warning from DTE group regarded these warnings as scare tactics.
ACCESSION #
32193522

 

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