TITLE

Sparsely Ionizing Diagnostic and Natural Background Radiations are Likely Preventing Cancer and Other Genomic-Instability-Associated Diseases

AUTHOR(S)
Scott, Bobby R.; Di Palma, Jennifer
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Dose-Response;2007, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p230
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neoplastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of cooperative protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair/apoptosis (presumed p53 related), an auxiliary apoptosis process (PAM process) that is presumed p53-independent, and stimulated immunity. These forms of induced protection are called adapted protection because they are associated with the radiation adaptive response. Diagnostic X-ray sources, other sources of sparsely ionizing radiation used in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures, as well as radioisotope-labeled immunoglobulins could be used in conjunction with apoptosis-sensitizing agents (e.g., the natural phenolic compound resveratrol) in curing existing cancer via low-dose fractionated or low-dose, low-dose-rate therapy (therapeutic radiation hormesis). Evidence is provided to support the existence of both therapeutic (curing existing cancer) and medical (cancer prevention) radiation hormesis. Evidence is also provided demonstrating that exposure to environmental sparsely ionizing radiations, such as gamma rays, protect from cancer occurrence and the occurrence of other diseases via inducing adapted protection (environmental radiation hormesis).
ACCESSION #
31974082

 

Related Articles

  • Radiation exposure and adaptive processes. Mossman, K.L.; Ledesma, L.M. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;1999, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p436 

    Provides information on a study related to adaptive response and radiation exposure. Relation of the dose that induces the adaptive response to human and environmental exposures; Effects of inducing the adaptive response; Association of the adaptive response to the concept of hormesis.

  • Radioadaptive response: responses to the five questions. Ikushima, T. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;1999, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p433 

    Presents responses to several questions related to the adaptive response (AR) to ionizing radiation. Relevance of AR to human and environmental exposures; Analysis on whether the induction of AR can be manipulated for medical and other benefits; How does AR relate to the concept of hormesis.

  • Summary and comments. Waldren, C.A. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;1999, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p452 

    Provides answers to several questions concerning adaptive response (AR) and hormesis elicited by ionizing radiation. How does the dose that induces AR relate to human and environmental exposure; Advantages and disadvantages of AR stimulation; Discussion on whether AR simulation can be...

  • The adaptive response to ionizing radiation: low dose effects unpredictable from high dose experiments. Rigaud, O. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;1999, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p443 

    Comments on several issues regarding adaptive response (AR) to ionizing radiation. Relevance of the dose that induces the AR to human and environmental exposures; Advantages and disadvantages of having induced AR; Issue on whether the induction of AR can be manipulated for medical and other...

  • Hormesis, an update of the present position. Johansson, Lennart // European Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging;2003, Vol. 30 Issue 6, p921 

    The ongoing debate over the possible beneficial effects of ionising radiation on health, hormesis, is reviewed from different perspectives. Radiation hormesis has not been strictly defined in the scientific literature. It can be understood as a decrease in the risk of cancer due to low-dose...

  • Adaptive response and its relationship to hormesis and low dose cancer risk estimation. Olivieri, G. // Human & Experimental Toxicology;1999, Vol. 18 Issue 7, p440 

    Focuses on the adaptive response (AR) and its relationship to hormesis and low dose cancer risk estimation. Analogies between AR and ionizing radiation; How does the dose that induces AR relate to human and environmental exposures; Potential advantages and disadvantages of the induction of AR;...

  • PATIENT DOSE MANAGEMENT IN CT, SPECT/CT AND PET/CT IMAGING. MATTSSON, Sören; SÖDERBERG, Marcus // Medical Physics in the Baltic States;Oct2010, p18 

    New imaging technologies that use x-rays or radiopharmaceuticals are continuously developed. The techniques are now also often combined into a single investigation, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT -- so called "hybrid imaging". The benefits of the new techniques are so dramatic that there is a...

  • Cyclin D1 in low-dose radiation-induced adaptive resistance. Ahmed, K. M.; Fan, M.; Nantajit, D.; Cao, N.; Li, J. J. // Oncogene;11/13/2008, Vol. 27 Issue 53, p6738 

    Cyclin D1 is involved in cell-cycle arrest in DNA-damage response. This study tested the hypothesis that cyclin D1 regulates mitochondrial apoptosis. Cyclin D1 was induced by low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR; 10-cGy X-ray) in human keratinocytes with an adaptive radioresistance that can be...

  • COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DOSE INDEX FOR HEAD CT IN NORTHERN NIGERIA. Garba, I.; Engel-Hills, P.; Davidson, F.; Tabari, A. M. // Radiation Protection Dosimetry;2015 Special Issue, Vol. 165, p98 

    Computed tomography dose indexw and dose length product were recorded for the purpose of developing diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for radiation dose optimisation. The study was conducted in three radiology departments with CT centres in Northern Nigeria. Data were collected from 54...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics