TITLE

COLE AND JOHNSON'S THE RED MOON, 1908-1910: REIMAGINING AFRICAN AMERICAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN FEMALE EDUCATION AT HAMPTON INSTITUTE

AUTHOR(S)
Seniors, Paula Marie
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Journal of African American History;Winter2008, Vol. 93 Issue 1, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explores the project of biracial education at Hampton Institute in Virginia, more specifically the relationship between the African American female teachers and the Native American female students, the racial hierarchies established at the school, and how Bob Cole, J. Rosamond Johnson and James Weldon Johnson reimagined the African American and Native American educational program in the all-black musical theater production "The Red Moon." A discussion of the historical background and social significance of the show is provided. Information is presented on the educational curriculum for Native American and African American female students at the institute.
ACCESSION #
31906254

 

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