TITLE

Follow in History's Wake

AUTHOR(S)
Mackay, Jean
PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Apr2008, Vol. 62 Issue 5, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers a historical background of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor in New York. The Erie Canal and the growth it attracted altered the landscapes of New York. The Mohawk Valley is one of the most picturesque sections of the canal. The state's canal system was also a nationally and internationally significant work of engineering, including aqueducts. On the other hand, cyclists can explore the Canalway Corridor on the 380-mile Erie Canalway Trail which follows both active and historic sections of the Erie Canal.
ACCESSION #
31879120

 

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