TITLE

The "Offensiveness" of Virginia Woolf: From a Moral to a Political Reading

AUTHOR(S)
McManus, Patricia
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Woolf Studies Annual;2008, Vol. 14, p91
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the offensiveness of Virginia Woolf's texts as seen by critics. The article contains quotation and excerpts from her works that magnify her offensive expression to the Jews, lower-class, negroes and women. The remainders are in the article supported with the critiques' statements of Woolf's moral, ethical, and political lapses.
ACCESSION #
31799765

 

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