TITLE

Isotopic abundance challenge

AUTHOR(S)
Meija, Juris
PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry;May2008, Vol. 391 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a challenge of isotopic abundance. According to the author, the mechanical laws governing the movements of seesaw swings come into play in natural variations of the isotopic abundances of chemical elements. Two isotopic abundance tables from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) reveal that there are a few elements in the periodic table for which the reported uncertainties of each isotopic abundance are in clear statistical disagreement with the stated uncertainties of the other isotopes.
ACCESSION #
31722431

 

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